• Marc Primo

3 Ways to Earn More By Being a Polyglot

This is an article “3 Ways to Earn More By Being a Polyglot” by Marc Primo


With more spare time at home and less time to socialize due to the COVID-19 pandemic, people are looking into more ways to hone their skills and earn money online. For those who have always wanted to learn a new language, opportunities for profit are out there more than anyone has previously imagined. One study even stated that by 2050, Spanish speakers are projected to factor in around $1.72 trillion in collective purchasing power across the U.S. This means that learning how to speak Spanish can give you an advantage to reach more people for business.



For many, being a polyglot or someone who can speak multiple languages is usually a personal choice rather than a career opportunity. However, recent years have shown a great demand for bilingual speakers doubling more than half the demand in five years. From 2010’s need of 240,000 to 630,000 by 2015 and still growing, polyglots are getting either corporate or low-skilled jobs across the country. People who can help target different markets for ad campaigns or provide translated copies for online collaterals for example, are getting breaks while streaming services have also increased the demand for polyglots who can translate subtitles for foreign audiences.


Aside from being translators or multilingual copywriters, here are other job opportunities you can check out if you are aspiring to be a polyglot.


Language teacher


Even in previous years, language teachers have always been in demand whether in developed or developing countries around the world. Picking rare languages to study such as certain variations of the Chinese language like Yue or Min or Western Siberia’s Hantima will indeed lower the chances of competition, but try to find out first if there’s a demand for bilingual teachers in certain territories.


Start by taking a language test and securing a certification or degree from the state or country you’re planning to teach in so you can either start earning either as a classroom or online language teacher and eventually take on relevant training jobs outside of the academe. Just note that some teaching positions require a master’s degree so you might as well secure that one too if you’re aiming for a long term career in education.


Interpreter


Being an interpreter is much like being a translator but in a spoken word sense. Like teachers, interpreters are also in demand in business or social circles with engagements that range from small group discussions to large assemblies.


Part of being an effective interpreter is the ability to convey emotion in speeches or basic talks by applying the proper context cues as they are used in the local vernacular or how the speaker wishes to deliver his or her statements. And if you think that jobs for interpreters are but a few, remember that there will always be open positions in airlines, police departments, and embassies that are suited for your particular kind of skill.


Blogger or Influencer


Irish polyglot Benny Lewis who came out with the book Fluent in 3 Months knows that mistakes will always be inevitable when learning a new language. However, that’s all part of the plan as you slowly master the skill and learn about your new language’s culture. Soon, you’ll know so much about them that you can even start your own blog and offer a different perspective for local audiences.


As you are studying your new language and culture, try jotting down your experiences in a journal as this could prove to be useful in the future and worth sharing to others. Collect images and practice descriptive sentences from your perspective but written in your new language and see how people will react to them. People who read blogs and follow influencers are not really looking for perfection when it comes to written words. Instead, they remember experiences that they can relate to--flaws and all, and decide whether you are genuinely reaching out to them and worth following on social media.